Questions And Answers On Nutrition Articles For High School Students

John asks…

Are Mcgill and Concordia the only english-instructed universities in Montreal?

Because i am planning to study there with my IB diploma, any suggestions? I am generally interested in psychology, but not sure if it will be boring, another choice for me will be food science or nutrition, does it require high chemistry mark for food science? And will good grades in ib psychology help me getting in mcgill?

mikiesen answers:

Hello!

Yes, Concordia and McGill are the only English-language universities in the city of Montreal, with Bishop’s university (in Sherbrooke) the third and final English-language university in the province of Quebec.

I work at Concordia and graduated from there recently as well, so I have to say that it’s a great school. The Psychology program is actually one of our most popular programs at the university, both for the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science.

Psychology is not a boring program in the slightest. Concordia’s BSc is very research-oriented, which is amazing to have at the undergraduate level. There are all sorts of great research projects coming out of Concordia, both on the level of students and professors. If you take a look through the Now Concordia news website (you can find it here http://www.concordia.ca/now/), you can find all sorts of great articles on what’s going on.

University life is really what you make of it, so as long as you’re committed to having fun you know you will. Psych students have all sorts of great activities they get involved with on- and off-campus too, so make sure to take a look at the student associations.

If you complete your full IB diploma you might be considered for additional standing. We don’t put more weight on your IB grades, so an IB student with a 90% average will not be given preference over a non-IB student of the same average, but we offer you the chance to get university credits taken off. (I think this might work the same for McGill, but don’t quote me on that) This means you’ll spend less time in school and will be out earlier!

If you have any questions about Concordia and/or programs/admissions you can drop me a line at facebook.com/CUFutureStudents where I’m a Page Admin.

Hope that helps! πŸ™‚

Davina asks…

What is a good herbal supplement to help relive stress and anxiety?

Im looking for something that you can get at a drugstore or vitamin store. Preferrably not some miracle herb that is sold only on the internet.

mikiesen answers:

Hello… I’m a High school student in Venezuela and i’m very interested in the nutrition career. I know a lot about it and i really want to answer your question. If you’re a little stressed out in this days i really recomend you to drink natural tea… ”Tile”, ”Camomile”or a ”no cafeine tea” could be great for that, ”Mcormick” or ”Lipton” teas are delicious!. Excercise is not a ”natural” or ”herbal” supplement but you could try it!… While excercising your body liberates ”toxics”… Endorphines or in spanish:”endorfinas” wich are… A big part of your stress!. Alimentation, or your ”daily diet” is also a part of the cause of your stress… Try not to hurry when you’re eating, just serve your food and seat! (don’t stand up while eting or don’t eat standed up), try to have good portions in each food and don’t try to take everything or prove everything before eating you’re plate!.

It’s simple, have a balanced diet:

Breakfast (make it simple: wheat toasts, butter, a ”cafe latte” or orange juice and fruit).
Lunch (combine! Protein is essential or grains if vegetarian: Chicken, fish or steak, and a good salad… Like ceasar?, fruit and a good tea for your metabolism).
Dinner (it could include wheat carbohidrates!: Chiken and salad, or just a chicken or ”cappresse” -tomato and mozzarella cheese- sandwich.)

It’s just an example!, just don’t eat the same thing everyday, that’s not balanced at all!. Try to exercise three times a week!… Walk, run, tae-bo or pilates ar great! Or do some yoga!, excercising a little is essential, 35 minutes could be… A little and very productive!. Drink a cup of hot tea, lemon and ”splenda” after lunch and at night before you go to bed, it will bring good results. Aight! I hope it works for you as it works for me! Good luck!…

This article could help you:

” Build your physical reserves.
Exercise for cardiovascular fitness three to four times a week (moderate, prolonged rhythmic exercise is best, such as walking, swimming, cycling, or jogging).
Eat well-balanced, nutritious meals.
Maintain your ideal weight.
Avoid nicotine, excessive caffeine, and other stimulants.
Mix leisure with work. Take breaks and get away when you can.
Get enough sleep. Be as consistent with your sleep schedule as possible.”

David asks…

What could I do with a wildlife conservation with zoo biology degree?

I think I would really enjoy this degree but I am worried about the career prospects afterwards. Zoo keeper is not an option. I would enjoy it, and I know it’s not all about the money but being happy, but I worked out the wages and found out I wouldn’t even be able to afford to rent a simple, small house! The wage is not enough for me to survive nevermind live.
Any ideas?
I am in the UK so only relevant answers please.

mikiesen answers:

Wildlife Manager – maintains or manipulates wildlife populations, habitats, or human users to produce benefits for wildlife and the general public. Benefits sought may be ecological, economic, social, recreational, or scientific. A wildlife manager uses wildlife science to formulate and apply scientifically sound solutions to wildlife and habitat management problems.

Wildlife Biologist – gathers, analyzes, and interprets data on wildlife and habitats, including behavior, disease, ecology, genetics, nutrition, population dynamics, physiology, land-use changes, and pollution to conserve wildlife species and improve habitat conditions. A wildlife biologist uses scientific principles to research wildlife and habitats to increase our knowledge base.

Wildlife Educator – teaches high school and university students about wildlife science and conservation including wildlife biology, ecology, physiology, disease, toxicology, taxonomy, economics, research and management techniques, and conservation policy and law.

Public Educator and Outreach Specialist – educates the public about wildlife species and conservation issues. Outreach specialists work with private and corporate landowners, industries, citizen groups, and others to provide technical assistance related to wildlife management on private or public farms, forests, parks, urban areas, and industrial lands. Outreach specialists apply economic principles and conservation practices to aid others in maintaining or restoring wildlife on their lands.

Wildlife Law Enforcement Officer – enforces wildlife laws and regulations to maintain wildlife populations at desired levels. Wildlife law enforcement officers often perform surveys of wildlife populations, are involved in trapping and banding programs, implement wildlife population controls, respond to complaints of nuisance wildlife, and educate the public about wildlife issues.

Wildlife Technician – collects data on wildlife and habitats under the supervision of a Wildlife Manager or Wildlife Biologists.

Wildlife Inspector and Forensics Specialist – intercepts smuggled, illegal shipments of live wild animals for the pet trade and wild animal parts for trophy or medicinal purposes. Wildlife inspectors are stationed at international airports, ocean ports, and border crossings. Forensics specialists perform scientific and investigative work to document the origin and nature of evidence collected on these illegal imports.

Communications and Public Relations Specialist – interprets wildlife research and conservation programs to present to the general public. Communications and public relations specialists write articles and news releases, create brochures and websites, photograph wildlife and conservation activities, and speak at public gatherings or through the media.

Wildlife Policy Analyst – applies wildlife management theories and practices to laws and regulations governing wildlife and habitats. Wildlife policy analysts often work for governments, legislative bodies, nonprofit organizations, or industry groups.

Wildlife Consultant – evaluates ecosystems to determine environmental impacts from proposed actions. Following standards created by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), consultants provide reports to businesses, industries, and governments to ensure quality environments.

Wildlife Economist – provides economic analyses of natural resources to support policies, critical habitat designation, assess damage, and analyze environmental plans.

Wildlife Administrator – works with many stakeholders and budgets to provide assistance in promoting sound resource management programs designed to effectively manage wildlife and habitats.

GIS Specialist – works with Geographic Information Systems and other technologies to interpret data and make management and policy recommendations concerning wildlife and their habitats.

Chris asks…

What are careers you can get with working with wildlife?

I want to go into a program studying wildlife and ecology management at Michigan tech and I wanted to know what kind of careers you can get.

mikiesen answers:

Wildlife Manager – maintains or manipulates wildlife populations, habitats, or human users to produce benefits for wildlife and the general public. Benefits sought may be ecological, economic, social, recreational, or scientific. A wildlife manager uses wildlife science to formulate and apply scientifically sound solutions to wildlife and habitat management problems.

Wildlife Biologist – gathers, analyzes, and interprets data on wildlife and habitats, including behavior, disease, ecology, genetics, nutrition, population dynamics, physiology, land-use changes, and pollution to conserve wildlife species and improve habitat conditions. A wildlife biologist uses scientific principles to research wildlife and habitats to increase our knowledge base.

Wildlife Educator – teaches high school and university students about wildlife science and conservation including wildlife biology, ecology, physiology, disease, toxicology, taxonomy, economics, research and management techniques, and conservation policy and law.

Public Educator and Outreach Specialist – educates the public about wildlife species and conservation issues. Outreach specialists work with private and corporate landowners, industries, citizen groups, and others to provide technical assistance related to wildlife management on private or public farms, forests, parks, urban areas, and industrial lands. Outreach specialists apply economic principles and conservation practices to aid others in maintaining or restoring wildlife on their lands.

Wildlife Law Enforcement Officer – enforces wildlife laws and regulations to maintain wildlife populations at desired levels. Wildlife law enforcement officers often perform surveys of wildlife populations, are involved in trapping and banding programs, implement wildlife population controls, respond to complaints of nuisance wildlife, and educate the public about wildlife issues.

Wildlife Technician – collects data on wildlife and habitats under the supervision of a Wildlife Manager or Wildlife Biologists.

Wildlife Inspector and Forensics Specialist – intercepts smuggled, illegal shipments of live wild animals for the pet trade and wild animal parts for trophy or medicinal purposes. Wildlife inspectors are stationed at international airports, ocean ports, and border crossings. Forensics specialists perform scientific and investigative work to document the origin and nature of evidence collected on these illegal imports.

Communications and Public Relations Specialist – interprets wildlife research and conservation programs to present to the general public. Communications and public relations specialists write articles and news releases, create brochures and websites, photograph wildlife and conservation activities, and speak at public gatherings or through the media.

Wildlife Policy Analyst – applies wildlife management theories and practices to laws and regulations governing wildlife and habitats. Wildlife policy analysts often work for governments, legislative bodies, nonprofit organizations, or industry groups.

Wildlife Consultant – evaluates ecosystems to determine environmental impacts from proposed actions. Following standards created by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), consultants provide reports to businesses, industries, and governments to ensure quality environments.

Wildlife Economist – provides economic analyses of natural resources to support policies, critical habitat designation, assess damage, and analyze environmental plans.

Wildlife Administrator – works with many stakeholders and budgets to provide assistance in promoting sound resource management programs designed to effectively manage wildlife and habitats.

GIS Specialist – works with Geographic Information Systems and other technologies to interpret data and make management and policy recommendations concerning wildlife and their habitats.

Http://joomla.wildlife.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=73

Graham asks…

Career that lets me work with wildlife and travel the world?

My passion has always been to save endangered species and to see their habitats across the globe. I wanted to know the careers that would let me do basically what I described above? I’m going to college in a year and I want to know if I can do what i love pretty soon.

mikiesen answers:

Wildlife Manager – maintains or manipulates wildlife populations, habitats, or human users to produce benefits for wildlife and the general public. Benefits sought may be ecological, economic, social, recreational, or scientific. A wildlife manager uses wildlife science to formulate and apply scientifically sound solutions to wildlife and habitat management problems.

Wildlife Biologist – gathers, analyzes, and interprets data on wildlife and habitats, including behavior, disease, ecology, genetics, nutrition, population dynamics, physiology, land-use changes, and pollution to conserve wildlife species and improve habitat conditions. A wildlife biologist uses scientific principles to research wildlife and habitats to increase our knowledge base.

Wildlife Educator – teaches high school and university students about wildlife science and conservation including wildlife biology, ecology, physiology, disease, toxicology, taxonomy, economics, research and management techniques, and conservation policy and law.

Public Educator and Outreach Specialist – educates the public about wildlife species and conservation issues. Outreach specialists work with private and corporate landowners, industries, citizen groups, and others to provide technical assistance related to wildlife management on private or public farms, forests, parks, urban areas, and industrial lands. Outreach specialists apply economic principles and conservation practices to aid others in maintaining or restoring wildlife on their lands.

Wildlife Law Enforcement Officer – enforces wildlife laws and regulations to maintain wildlife populations at desired levels. Wildlife law enforcement officers often perform surveys of wildlife populations, are involved in trapping and banding programs, implement wildlife population controls, respond to complaints of nuisance wildlife, and educate the public about wildlife issues.

Wildlife Technician – collects data on wildlife and habitats under the supervision of a Wildlife Manager or Wildlife Biologists.

Wildlife Inspector and Forensics Specialist – intercepts smuggled, illegal shipments of live wild animals for the pet trade and wild animal parts for trophy or medicinal purposes. Wildlife inspectors are stationed at international airports, ocean ports, and border crossings. Forensics specialists perform scientific and investigative work to document the origin and nature of evidence collected on these illegal imports.

Communications and Public Relations Specialist – interprets wildlife research and conservation programs to present to the general public. Communications and public relations specialists write articles and news releases, create brochures and websites, photograph wildlife and conservation activities, and speak at public gatherings or through the media.

Wildlife Policy Analyst – applies wildlife management theories and practices to laws and regulations governing wildlife and habitats. Wildlife policy analysts often work for governments, legislative bodies, nonprofit organizations, or industry groups.

Wildlife Consultant – evaluates ecosystems to determine environmental impacts from proposed actions. Following standards created by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), consultants provide reports to businesses, industries, and governments to ensure quality environments.

Wildlife Economist – provides economic analyses of natural resources to support policies, critical habitat designation, assess damage, and analyze environmental plans.

Wildlife Administrator – works with many stakeholders and budgets to provide assistance in promoting sound resource management programs designed to effectively manage wildlife and habitats.

GIS Specialist – works with Geographic Information Systems and other technologies to interpret data and make management and policy recommendations concerning wildlife and their habitats.

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